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11/04/2008 10:58 AM ID: 74527 Permalink   

Biker Killed in Collision with Bird

 

The coronor has ruled the death of 52-year-old Ian Bottomley an accidental death after he collided with a pheasant while riding his motorcycle earlier in the year. He was found with feathers all around him and on his helmet near the dead bird.

The father of two had been riding at 77 mph in an area speed limited to 60 mph but PC Adrian Harrison told the inquest that the collision would have been fatal even if he hadn't been speeding.

"A one-in-a-million accident took a one-in-a-million man," said his widow, Ann.

 
  Source: www.thesun.co.uk  
    WebReporter: ixuzus Show Calling Card      
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  10 Comments
  
  A bird hit my car antenna once.  
 
The bird exploded.
 
  by: walter3ca   11/04/2008 06:13 PM     
  actually..  
 
If he was traveling the alloted 60mph he would have missed that pheasant.. The pheasant would have swooped just before he got to the ill-fated spot. Of course hind-sight is only conjecture which is well wishing which is.. my opinion... :)
 
  by: RAD     11/04/2008 06:18 PM     
  @RAD  
 
How in the world would you know that?

You're just talking rubbish mate.
 
  by: M4CRO_   11/04/2008 07:35 PM     
  Well..  
 
It *is* logical though.
 
  by: StarShadow     11/04/2008 08:06 PM     
  maybe  
 
If we are going down the "what if path" then if he kept going 60MPH he would have ridden into a terrible wreck 10 miles down the road.

Now at 65MPH he would have become a millionaire. go figure.
 
  by: Trevelyan   11/04/2008 08:46 PM     
  I was hoping  
 
it would be an emu or some other big bird, damn you. I hit a turtle with my car once, a rabbit and a bird, birds are bad feathers were all through the car.
 
  by: shiftyfarker   11/05/2008 11:58 PM     
  I thought  
 
the story was going to be about a guy on a bicycle that got killed by a bird (pecked to death)
 
  by: shaohu     11/06/2008 06:46 PM     
  @M4CRO_  
 
It is simple physics. Assuming he was travelling at a roughly constant speed, 30 seconds before he hit the bird he would have to travel 30 seconds at 77mph in order to reach the position when the bird was there.

Had he been travelling at 60mph he would have taken longer than 30 seconds to reach that same point and there is a good chance that either the bird would not be there anymore (since there were feathers on his helmet we can assume the bird was in flight.

The 77mph = 34.4 metres per second. 60mph = 26.8 metres per second.
 
  by: Eidron   11/07/2008 01:50 PM     
  ...  
 
Ignore the word "either" there.
 
  by: Eidron   11/07/2008 01:51 PM     
  @all  
 
I ride bikes and used to live in a small village in Norfolk - there are shit loads of pheasants around. The assumption you're all making is that the pheasant would fly up at the same time regardless of his speed, I can assure you this is not likely. Pheasants are pretty stupid birds, and often jump out in the path of oncomming traffic. Chances are, if he'd been doing the speed limit, the pheasant would have jumped out when he reached the same distance from the bird as when he was doing (up to, as the source says) 77mph. The only difference would be he might have slightly more of a chance to see it and react, but we're talking less than a second.

It is a one in a million accident, and the key to avoiding it is to know when the crop of young pheasants show up and keep an eye out for them, but even then they can be pretty well hidden. There have been plenty of times when I've had to duck and dodge from pheasants jumping out of nowhere. That, and pigeons drunk and heavy on acorns fermented in their stomachs.

Anyway, my point is that speed is far less of a major cause of accidents then many organisations lead you to believe. Excessive speed can be an issue, but I would argue even 77 (and I bet he was doing less, knowing the Sun) isn't necessarily excessive depending on the road conditions, and even then it's not usually a cause of an accident but something that can make one worse.
 
  by: TWeaKoR   11/07/2008 08:47 PM     
 
 
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