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03/08/2010 11:35 AM ID: 83265 Permalink   

Happy People More Talkative, Talk Less Small Talk

 

A group of psychologists from two universities in the United States have found that people who classified themselves as happy were also more talkative than their unhappy counterparts and their conversation had more substance.

Participants in the study were equipped with an Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) over a four-day period. 30 seconds of conversation were sampled by the device every 12 and a half minutes.

The study found that the happiest people to take part in the study spent 25% less time alone than the unhappiest people, and spent 70% more time talking. They also had twice as many substantive conversations and just a third of the small talk.

 
  Source: news.yahoo.com  
    WebReporter: Lois_Lane Show Calling Card      
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  9 Comments
  
  Blab, Blab  
 
Yes I know these people. They are happy blabbing -- and making the receiver on their blabbing (me) very unhappy.
 
  by: grayxray   03/08/2010 04:58 PM     
  @Gray  
 
You should be very pleased that you will never met me then. :)
 
  by: captainJane     03/08/2010 07:00 PM     
  introspection  
 
Happy people just tend to think their conversations contain more ´substance´. In my opinion there aren´t a lot of social circles where conversations really contain significant amounts of real substance over ´small talk´.
 
  by: bane39   03/08/2010 07:57 PM     
  yeah  
 
where does small talk end and substance begin?
 
  by: sceptre_of_fertility   03/09/2010 04:41 AM     
  Small Talk Gets a Bum Rap  
 
While I agree with the University of Arizona researchers who performed the study that ‘the happy life is social and conversationally deep rather than solitary and superficial,’ the conclusions that media have taken from the study—that small talk leaves people unhappy—is misplaced. It is the inability many people have to meaningfully connect with others that leaves them unhappy and socially isolated.

I base my views on nearly 30 years of teaching and writing on the subject of small talk and conversation. It is my experience that far from making people unhappy, small talk serves at least two critical roles to creating meaningful conversations and relationships:

I maintain that small talk is an important skill to bridge that gap and a prerequisite for more substantive conversations.

Don Gabor is communications trainer and author of How to Start a Conversation and Make Friends. He can be reached for further comments on this subject at 718-768-0824, via email at don@dongabor.com or visit his website, http://www.dongabor.com.
 
  by: Don Gabor   03/09/2010 03:55 PM     
  I think  
 
unhappy people are more guarded, that´s why the stuff they say has less substance. They don´t want to reveal much of themselves, they keep it superficial.
 
  by: gryphon50a   03/09/2010 04:09 PM     
  Conversation...  
 
is dying full stop!

I loved it when I bumped into someone working in subjects I could only dream of!
 
  by: captainJane     03/09/2010 07:28 PM     
  Talking is obsolete  
 
I can be sitting two feet from someone, but I´d rather send an email then vocally communicate with them.
 
  by: Tetsuru Uzuki     03/10/2010 06:04 PM     
  @TU  
 
I agree that language is dying out due to frivolous technology. It´s a travesty. I think people have serious issues when they would rather text or email (email is obsolete) than verbally communicate. I despise what cell phones have done to society.
 
  by: Lurker     05/16/2010 07:04 PM     
 
 
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